Julesburg

“In its palmiest days, during overland staging and freighting, old Julesburg had, all told, not to exceed a dozen buildings, including station, telegraph office, store, blacksmith shop, warehouse, stable, and a billiard saloon. At the latter place there was dispensed at all hours of the day and night the vilest of liquor at ‘two bits’ a glass. Being a ‘home’ station and the end of a division, also a junction on the stage line, and having a telegraph office in the southeast corner of the station, naturally made it, in the early ’60’s, one of the most important points on the great overland route. It was also the east end of the Denver division, about 200 miles in length. . . .

“Where [Jules] kept this station the crossing of the South Platte was widely known as ‘Julesburg.’ The place was also known by many freighters on the plains as “Upper California Crossing.” Here there were frequent troubles which first began in the spring of 1859. Being a sort of rendezvous for gamblers, for some time it was regarded as the toughest town between the Missouri river and the mountains. After Holladay came into possession of the great stage line, knowing the bad name that had for some time been attached to Julesburg, he subsequently gave the place the somewhat high-sounding name of Overland City.”